Similarly to any industry, I’m sure, a huge part of being successful in the mobile gaming industry is making connections with the people you do work with. Whether it’s with your coworkers, employees, managers, owners, or partners, it’s a crucial piece of the puzzle.

1) Get Out There

Go to that mobile gaming conference. Network, network, network. Meet as many of the right people as you can, make connections, and add them on LinkedIn afterward (in that order, not reversed). The best way to become a known figure or company in the mobile gaming world is by putting yourself out there and saying yes to every relevant event that presents itself to you. In other words, keep swiping right!

 

Yes, some conferences may be in China (like ChinaJoy, which our COO went to last week!) but there are also lots that are a little more attainable in the near vicinity.

 

2) Avoid Cold Calls

We all get those emails or phone calls that are generic, without any personal touch that I think I can safely say are a little annoying. Don’t be the one sending those. Making in-person connections is so much more effective than blindly putting out your feelers via email, hoping someone will bite.

 

Non-personalized, ‘blanket’ messages that pop up in your LinkedIn inbox are about as effective as a stranger sliding into your DMs and writing “hey”. How likely are you to respond to that message? I’m going to take a leap here and say not very.

 

That being said, I do understand that sometimes this is hard to avoid. Maybe you’re reaching out to someone in a different country and can’t just hop in a plan to go shake hands. If that’s the case then continue reading.

 

3) Stand Out From the Crowd

If it’s just not feasible to meet someone in person, you may have to contact them out of the blue. Before doing that, make sure to follow these guidelines:

 

    • Have a grabbing subject line. If it’s not captivating and demands the attention of the reader, it’s going in the trash.
    • Avoid clickbait wording. Words like “IMPORTANT” and “NOW” (especially when they’re in caps) will not only scream clickbait, they also seem a little demanding.
    • Remember the 5-second rule. No, not the food dropping one, the attention span one. If your email doesn’t capture the reader’s attention within the first 5 seconds, chances are it’s heading to the trash. Get straight to the point, keep it relatively short and make SURE there aren’t any typos or grammatical errors.

 

 

4) Find the Right Time

Have you ever been absolutely swamped with work only to have someone come to you with yet another problem that needs to be solved? That person who came to you while you were in complete distress either a) Isn’t good at reading a room and had no clue you were an absolute stress-case or b) Lacks respect for your time.

 

Neither one isn’t any good so you don’t want to be that person, ever.

 

If you need to have an important conversation with someone, make sure the timing is right. For example, 4:50 pm on a Friday afternoon may not be the best time to reach out. That may be obvious to some, but you’d be surprised how many people are doing this on a daily basis.

 

The same goes for reaching out to new people, sending out press releases and, to be honest, most things in the mobile world. Once you study the rhythm and patterns of the industry, you’ll become a master at knowing exactly when to pounce.

 

5) Have Face-To-Face Conversations

We live in a time when it’s all too easy to pick up your phone and shoot off a quick text or email, which is fine in a lot of cases, but it’s so important to occasionally get in that face time.

No, not FaceTime.


Face-to-face conversations allow people to pick up on body language and problem solve by going back and forth without a chain of hundreds of emails that clutter up your inbox. We’ve all been caught in a reply-all nightmare before. It also lowers the odds of miscommunication that happen frequently over text and email. Being able to actually SEE someone’s face is huge in communicating properly.

 

Just a couple of weeks ago, after months of phone calls and emails with our website designing partner, Arctic Empire, I decided that for my final wrap up questions, I wanted to tackle them in person. What I took away from this was that I not only should have done it weeks ago, but we were a LOT more productive in the hour of face time than we had been for the weeks leading up to that.

 

6) Don’t Play the Blame Game

Having mobile gaming partners is exactly that: a partnership. Nothing good ever comes from pointing fingers so instead of blaming someone for a mix-up or mistake, work on how you can fix it together.

 

This will not only avoid people getting offended, the person who did make the error will appreciate your efforts in not ‘throwing them under the bus’ and in turn, create a sense of respect, which will hopefully go both ways.

 

7) Honesty is the Best Policy

 

Doesn’t this rule apply to everything in life? When in doubt, tell the truth. Thanks for instilling the importance of that in me, Dad. Never get caught a white lie (what the heck is a ‘white lie’, anyway?).

 

Telling the truth isn’t only the right thing to do, it means you don’t have to keep track of what you’ve said, eliminating unnecessary stress. Easy enough, right?

 

8) Be Authentic & Stick to Your Morals

Successful business people can quickly sniff out phoniness. If you stick to what you believe in, follow your moral compass and stay consistent in your mobile business practices, you will be in great shape.

 

It’s easy to be passionate about something you truly believe in. Whether that’s a new mobile app, a revamped website or your company as a whole, people are naturally drawn to passion. That fire from within is hard to fake so create something you’re proud of and people will be able to feel your authenticity.

 

There you have it: 8 ways to build and maintain relationships in the mobile gaming industry. You may have noticed the common thread that all of these have: Communication. Keeping those lines of communication open is key and once that’s been mastered, your professional relationships will grow stronger and be better than ever.